Pre Internship - Middle Years

EFLD Unit Plan

Developed By: Cassandra Busch

 

School
FRAMEWORK FOR BACKWARDS DESIGN UNIT PLANNING
             Adapted from: Wiggins, Grant and J. McTighe. (1998). Understanding by Design, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
 
STAGE #1: IDENTIFY DESIRED LEARNING RESULTS (Begin with the End in Mind)

                     What will students know, understand and be able to do?

1.          OUTCOMES, Broad Areas of Learning and Cross Curricular Competencies (CCCs)

·          Become familiar with goals & outcomes for grade/subject, including Treaty Outcomes

·          Review the Broad Areas of Learning and Cross Curricular Competencies

***Choose specific outcomes AFTER you identify the CONCEPT/BIG IDEA

 
   

2.          CONCEPT (BIG IDEA) Draw on a separate document, include with unit

·          Identify the main concept or topic you are thinking of for your unit

·          Draw a concept map to brainstorm ideas, to make connections, create a visual to guide unit

·          Place information on concept map; core concept to major points to significant details

 

 
 

3.          QUESTION(S) FOR DEEPER UNDERSTANDING (ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS)

·          Design 1 or 2 essential question(s) [Open-ended, thought-provoking, calls for higher order thinking skills, sparks inquiry, raises additional questions, requires support & justification and not just an answer, timeless]Ex. Why do people move? How do you feed a growing world?

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)

Essential Question: What and who is a hero?
Guiding Questions: What characteristics do heroes and anti-heroes have? What do heroes look like, sound like, and feel like? Who do you classify as a hero and anti-hero? What and who is missing from our descriptions of a hero? Of an anti-hero?

 

Broad Areas of Learning: Building Life-Long Learners, Building a Sense of Self and Community, Building Engaged Citizens
Cross-Curricular Competences: Developing Thinking, Developing Identity and Interdependence, Developing Literacies, Developing Social Responsibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAGE #2: DETERMINE EVIDENCE OF LEARNING (Assessment & Evaluation)

How will students & teachers know if the learning outcome has been achieved?

Outcomes (Students need to know)

What a student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.

Indicators (Students are able to do)

Ways that students demonstrate their learning of an outcome; think ‘verb’; tells the story of outcome.

 

Subject 1: English Language Arts

CR6.1 View, listen to, read, comprehend, and respond to a variety of texts that address identity (e.g., Growing Up), social responsibility (e.g., Going the Distance), and efficacy (e.g., Making Our Community More Peaceful).

 

CR6.2 Select and use appropriate strategies to construct meaning before (e.g., considering what they know and need to know about topic), during (e.g., making connections to prior knowledge and experiences), and after (e.g., drawing conclusions) viewing, listening, and reading.

 

AR6.2
Appraise own viewing, listening, reading, representing, speaking, and writing skills and strategies, and set goals for improvement.

 

AR6.3 Appraise own and others’ work for clarity.

 

 

 

Subject 2: Treaty Education

SI62: Analyze the importance of the preservation and promotion of First Nations and Métis languages.

Indicators:

 

 

Subject 3: Health Education

 

USC 6.1 Analyze the factors that influence the development of personal standards and identity, and determine the impact on healthy decision making (including cultural norms, societal norms, family values, peer pressures, mass media, traditional knowledge, white privilege, legacy of colonization, and heterosexual privilege).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject 1: English Language Arts

 

CR6.1
(a) View, listen to, read, and respond to a variety of visual, multimedia (including digital), oral, and print texts that address the grade-level themes and issues related to identity, social responsibility, and efficacy including those that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socio-economic status, ability, age, gender, sexual orientation, language, career pathway).

 

(b) Demonstrate comprehension and response to visual, oral, print, and multimedia (including digital) texts by:

 

understanding the ideas in texts by clearly, completely, and accurately summarizing and explaining the explicit and implicit messages and main ideas (including setting, main characters, conflicts, events) in texts; citing details that support the main ideas; making logical inferences; interpreting obvious themes or author’s message logically.

 

understanding how texts are organized and presented for effect (and use the text structures and features) to construct meaning and evaluate craft and technique (e.g., elements) of different types of text including visual (e.g., colour), multimedia (e.g., special effects), oral (e.g., tone), and print fiction (e.g., short story, drama, poetry, novel) and non-fiction (e.g., autobiography, biography, informational, newspaper, reference) and organizational structure within different texts (e.g., problem/solution, compare/contrast, cause/effect, order of importance, chronological).

 

responding to and interpreting texts by responding with clear, complete, and accurate information that includes specific references to the texts; offering reactions and opinions about texts; making, explaining, and justifying reactions and personal connections to texts; making explicit and deliberate connections with previous knowledge and experiences; giving opinions and making judgements supported by reasons, explanations, and evidence; drawing conclusions about ideas on the basis of evidence; making logical interpretations of the author’s message; making and supporting inferences about characters’ feelings, motivations, and point of view.

 

 

CR6.2 Understand that listening, reading, and viewing are processes that require the use of several strategies before, during, and after listening, reading, and viewing including:

 

(a) Before: Select and use a range of strategies before listening, reading, and viewing including:

  • tap, activate, and build prior knowledge (e.g., consider what is known and needs to be known about topic)
  • ask questions (e.g., generate questions to address the “needs to be known”)
  • preview text (e.g., preview beginning events)
  • anticipate message and author’s/presenter’s intent (e.g., consider title and what is known about author)
  • predict what text will be about (e.g., consider the accompanying visuals and headings)

set purpose (e.g., set focus on what “need to and might learn” about topic).

 

(b) During: Select and use a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning including:

  • connect and construct meaning (e.g., make connections to own lives and contemporary issues and problems; make connections to self, text, and world)
  • note key ideas and what supports them (e.g., identify the problem, the key events, and the problem resolution; find important ideas and identify supporting details)
  • construct mental images (e.g., think critically about the writer’s/presenter’s use of language to evoke sensory images, feelings, or mood)
  • make, confirm, and adjust predictions (e.g., consistently make predictions using evidence from the text to support thinking; make predictions using text features)
  • make, confirm, and adjust inferences and draw conclusions (e.g., use stated or implied ideas to support interpretation of text; make judgements and draw conclusions about ideas in texts)
  • ask questions (e.g., ask questions to check understanding and evaluate text’s message)
  • use cueing systems to construct meaning and self-monitor comprehension (e.g., self-monitor understanding and ask questions when meaning is lost; clarify the meaning of words and concepts, and check understanding)

adjust rate and/or strategy (e.g., match silent and oral reading rate to specific purpose and difficulty of text).

 

(c) After: Select and use a range of strategies to confirm and extend meaning including:

  • recall, paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize (e.g., remember information from factual texts and use strategies for remembering it; summarize main ideas to arrive at new understanding or conclusion; synthesize information from two different points of view)
  • reflect and interpret (e.g., think critically about conclusions)
  • evaluate (respond critically) (e.g., understand subtexts where the author is saying one thing but meaning another; draw conclusions about the validity of ideas and information; identify fact and opinion)
  • evaluate craft and techniques (e.g., recognize, understand, and discuss symbolism; understand how layout contributes to the meaning and effectiveness of texts)
  • respond personally (giving support from text) (e.g., support thinking beyond the text with specific evidence based on personal experience)

listen, read, or view again and speak, write, and represent to deepen understanding and pleasure (e.g., express opinion about ideas, themes, issues, and experiences presented in texts using examples from texts to support).

 

 

AR6.2
(a) Reflect on speaking, writing, and other representing strategies used including relating work to criteria (e.g., a rubric), identifying what worked during the process, responding to feedback, setting realistic goals, and taking steps toward achieving goals.

 

(e) Review own and others’ work for clarity, and give concrete suggestions for improvement.

 

(f) Assess own contributions to group process, and set goals for enhancing group work.

(g) Identify and analyze effectiveness of a variety of language strategies. Identify competency level of self as a viewer, representer, listener, speaker, reader, and writer.

 

AR6.3

(a)Reflect on speaking, writing, and other representing strategies used including relating work to criteria (e.g., a rubric), identifying what worked during the process, responding to feedback, setting realistic goals, and taking steps toward achieving goals.

 

(e) Review own and others’ work for clarity, and give concrete suggestions for improvement.

 

(f) Assess own contributions to group process, and set goals for enhancing group work.

 

(g) Identify and analyze effectiveness of a variety of language strategies. Identify competency level of self as a viewer, representer, listener, speaker, reader, and writer.

 

Subject 2: Treaty Education
 Express how one’s cultural identity is influenced by language.

 Explore initiatives in Canada that contribute to the preservation and restoration of First Nations languages.

 Describe how the loss of language impacts cultural identity (e.g., importance of ceremony, song, dance, storytelling).

 

 

 

 

 

Subject 3: Health Education

 

(b) Propose why people behave the way they do (e.g., personal beliefs, societal norms).

(c) Identify sources of, and evaluate information about, personal beliefs and values.

 

(f) Consider how and why personal values may change (e.g., norms, trends, values/priorities, relationships, critical events).

(l) Analyze events or factors that cause people to make decisions that reflect or conflict with their personal standards.

 

Key Understandings: ‘I Can’ statements

Write the key learnings into student-friendly language that begin with ‘I can…’. The students should know what these are at the beginning of the lesson.

 

I can identify the characteristics of a hero and anti-hero.

 

I can inquire and disrupt the normative narratives of a hero and anti-hero.

 

I can write a clear multi-paragraph composition of at least 400 words.

I can create a narrative-composition that establishes plot, setting, point of view and developed characters.

 

I can ask critical and engaging questions.

 

I can edit and revise my own and others writing pieces.

 

I can describe how the loss of language impact cultural identity. And recognize how storytelling is an important aspect of restoring cultural identity.

 

I can analyze the events and factors that cause heroes and/or anti-heroes to act in the way that they do.

 

I can consider how/why personal values may change under certain circumstances.

 

 

              Questions for deeper understanding

What provocative questions will foster inquiry into the content? (open ended questions that stimulate thought and inquiry linked to the content of the enduring understanding)

  • What is a hero for you? Do they exist?
  • What is an anti-hero for you? Do they exist?
  • What makes someone an anti-hero?
  • Can someone be a hero and an anti-hero at the same time?
  • What groups of people are missing from the typical hero narrative?
  • What happens to people when they become heroes? In what way do they change? In what way do our expectations of them change?
  • Can you think of any heroes who have suddenly become villains because of scandals? If they had been “ordinary people” would they have had the same problems?
  • Have you ever had a personal hero who let you down in some way?
  • What makes a hero a hero?
  • What are some problems with being a hero?
  • Who are some (choose nationality) heroes?
  • What are the benefits of being a hero?
  • Why do people need heroes?
  • How do heroes change the world?
  • What are the standards that I will expect myself to live by at all times?  Do I except others to do the same?
  • What are my standards for dealing with challenges/ problems?  How may heroes or anti-heroes deal with challenges/problems?
  • What are the boundaries for the attitudes and actions that I will accept for myself, my peers, my family, and my community? Do my expectations change for heroes/anti-heroes?
  • What standards are parts of my cultural heritage?
  • How do personal values change?
  • How are standards linked to identity?

 

 

   

        

           STAGE 3: PLAN LEARNING EXPERIENCES & INSTRUCTION

           What are the learning experiences for all students to achieve outcomes?

 

Learning Tasks & Experiences

Where are your students headed? Where have they been?

How will you make sure the students know where they are going?

Teacher Resources

What teacher resources will you need to support your knowledge in this unit?

 

Teacher’s Resource Model – Western Edition for Tales- Heroes, Deeds, and Wonders Collection 6 by Kim Newlove

 

How To Be An Effective Teacher – The First Days of School by Harry K. Wong & Rosemary T.wong

 

Literacy: Reading, Writing and Children’s Literature by Gordon Winch, Rosemary Ross Johnston, Paul March, Lesley Ljungdahl, Marcelle Holliday

 

TeachersPayTeachers: Literature Circle Roles by Marine Freibrun

 

Shannon Thunderbird. Art of Indigenous Storytelling, music, theatre, dance. http://www.shannonthunderbird.com/art_of_indigenous_storytelling.htm

 

Thun

 

 

Student Resources
What student resources will you use in the learning experiences to meet the outcomes?

 

What Would She Do? 25 True stories of trailblazing rebel women. By Kay Woodward

 

 

Nancy Loewen – Anti-Hero Stories

The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All
Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All
Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All
Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All
Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All

 

(adaptations/add on books)

Western Edition for Tales- Heroes, Deeds, and Wonders Collection 6 by Kim Newlove

 

Ms. Marvel No Normal by Wilson Alphona

 

Shannon Thunderbird. Art of Indigenous Storytelling, music, theatre, dance. http://www.shannonthunderbird.com/art_of_indigenous_storytelling.htm

 

 

Community Resources
What community resources will you engage (guest speakers, elders, field trips)

Could invite a local hero into the classroom to talk about their life experiences.
Could invite someone who is perceived as an Anti-Hero to talk about their life experiences.

 

 

Instructional Strategies & Adaptations

(Adaptive Dimension, Differentiated Learning)

A. Resources: The “WHAT”

 

-provide resources in a variety of formats (print, visual, audio, multimedia)
-electronic devices (audio recordings, video recordings, YouTube)
-Use visual dictionaries to look up new words/definitions
-Use a variety of developing narrative writing techniques ( mind maps, story maps, story boards, drafting, typing, story-telling)
-Journals
-Use a variety of methods that support the Multiple Intelligences
-Practice a variety of writing techniques (Literary Luminary, Word Wizard, Stellar Summarizer, Adventuring Artist, Discussion Director)

 

 

B. Instruction: The “HOW”

-Offer students more time to respond orally in group discussions
-Use multi-sensory instructional materials
-Record voices orally
-Use a combination of advanced and simple vocabulary during instruction and conversation with students
-pre-teach challenging vocabulary
-provide active learning opportunities
-Talk-Pair-Share
-Sticky Note activities

 

C. Assessment: The “Show What You Know”

-presentations
-group work
-talk-pair-share
-individual work
-Kinesthetic activities
-Engagement/participation

 

D. Learning Environment: The “WHERE”
-provide an area that is free from distractions for students who need it
-model for students how to organize their work
-Utilize the outdoors as much as possible (can have group discussions/talking circles outdoors)

 

 

 

 

 

STAGE 4: Assess and Reflect
Formative Assessment:
Class Discussions/Talk-Pair-Share (anecdotal notes)
Sticky Note Questions

Summative Assessment:
Literature Circles (rubric)
Narrative Writing – Anti-Hero Story (rubric)
Storytelling (rubric)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Plan At-A-Glance

 

8 – 10 Lessons                                                                Overview

 

ERDG 317 Course Connections to the Grade 6 Hero and Anti-Hero Unit Plan

 

Through class readings, discussions and assignments, our ERDG 317 course has prepared us with methods to teach critical reading and writing techniques. My ultimate takeaway from this course was to use literacy as a tool to engage in social action and to disrupt normative narratives. I developed a Grade 6 Thematic Unit that involves disrupting the normative narratives in relation to heroes and anti-heroes. During the course of 8-15 lessons, students will be given opportunities to engage in discussions that encourage them to disrupt their common sense ideologies of what it means to be a hero and an anti-hero. Students will discover what and who are missing from the typical characteristics and assumptions that are commonly made. I hope that this unit results in students recognizing that minority groups such as the youth, elderly, gender, ethnicity and race are often missed from the hero normative. This should spark conversations about why this is an issue and students should inquire ways in which they can make social change to encourage inclusivity, acceptance and understandings of all people.

 

              


1

Introduction of Thematic Heroes and Anti Heroes Unit (Tales-Heroes, Deeds, and Wonders Unit). Students will consider the imaginary worlds of hero’s and anti-hero’s by engaging in a range of genres and authors. Students will be encouraged to disrupt the normative narratives of what it means to be a hero and who is considered a hero.

 

Essential Question: What and who is a hero?
Guiding Questions: What characteristics do heroes and anti-heroes have? What do heroes look like, sound like, and feel like? Who do you classify as a hero and anti-hero? What and who is missing from our descriptions of a hero?

 

Set: Students will participate in a class discussion where we will together come up with a definition of a hero and an anti-hero. Write the definitions on the board. Ask students to write it down on the handout sheet. (Attached below)
Once we have developed two definitions, teacher will share the dictionary definitions of a hero and anti-hero with the students. Teacher should write these definitions on the board/smart board.
Definition of hero: a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities.

Definition of an anti-hero: An antihero is a main character in a story who lacks heroic qualities, such as courage and morality. They sometimes perform actions that or morally correct but is done for the wrong reasons.

Give students a few minutes to change their descriptions of a hero and anti-hero on their activity sheets, if they believe changes need to be made from their original definitions.

 

Development: Students will work with their elbow buddies (partners) to develop two mind maps. One mind map will be designated for a hero and one will be designated for an anti-hero. Students will be asked to brainstorm: Who is a hero/anti-hero, what do they look like (physical appearance description), what do they act like (personality qualities), people they consider to be a hero/anti-hero, what do they do? (what makes them a hero/anti-hero).

 

Once students are finished developing their mind maps, bring their attention back to the front. Teacher will draw two mind maps on the board. Ask student volunteers to share their answers, write them on the board. Encourage students to add the ideas they do not already have on their mind map to their own.

Closure: Ask students what commonalities they have discovered with everyone’s answers. Ask what and who is missing from our descriptions of a hero? Students may notice that minority groups are missing from their descriptions (young, elderly, disabled, female, ethnicity, race). Ask students why they think this is an issue? Why are minority groups not commonly portrayed as hero’s?

 

Ask who is missing from our descriptions of an anti-hero? Why do you think they are commonly portrayed this way? Why do you think this is an issue?


2
Set: (10 mins)

Ask students to remind you who was missing from the hero narrative from last day. (young, elderly, disabled, female, ethnicity, race). Share with students that we will be reading stories from “What Would She Do? 25 True Stories of Trailblazing Rebel Women”, these are all true stories about historic world leaders, scientists, artists and pioneers. These women are brave, empowering and have endured struggles that make each of them heroes.

 

Read Allowed: “What Would She Do? by Kay Woodward.”
Read the introduction and page 8-11 about Cleopatra the Egyptian Icon.
At the end of each chapter there is a question “What would cleopatra do…?”
Question: “The girls in school say that your clothes are all wrong. They either too long, too fancy, too blue, too baggy, too floaty, too flowery, or too plain. Is there anything you can wear without them laughing at you? What would Cleopatra do?” (p.11).

Give students a few minutes to consider what they would do. Ask for any volunteers to share their answer. (Can handout sticky notes for students to jot their ideas down on a piece of paper).

 

Answer: “Easy, Cleopatra would do absolutely nothing. Nada. Zilch. She’d know that other people’s opinions don’t matter when they’re only designed to make someone feel bad. Cleopatra would carry on wearing what she loved (probably a glitzy gold headdress, but you might not want to go quite that far) and know that as long as she felt great, she’d look great too” (p.11).

 

Ask students what they think of her answer, do you agree with her opinion? Disagree? Why?

 

Development: (45 mins)
Students will be introduced to the group literary circles and roles activities. Handout the Literary circles and roles activity sheet. (attached below)

The literary circles will take approximately 5-7 classes to complete.

Every day each group will be designated 1 of the 5 Nancy Loewen Anti-Hero stories. At the beginning of each lesson the teacher will go over a mini lesson that describes each of the literary roles. Each student will read the story and engage in the literary role independently. (After the introductory lesson students will have the opportunity to engage in a story talk with their group mates. Here students will share their answers with each other) At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

 

·       Literary Luminary (Day One)

·       Word Wizard (Day Two)

·       Stellar Summarizer (Day Three)

·       Adventuring Artist (Day Four)

·       Discussion Director (Day Five)

 

Today, all students will be working on the Literary Luminary literature role. Description of role: (students will already have the literary package, they can follow along as teacher explains the directions)
Directions: After reading the assigned pages or chapters, go back and re-read

some sections that you found the most interesting. Think about the parts that

were funny, confusing, meaningful, happy, sad, or any other parts that were

thought provoking. Once you have located the sections, fill out the chart below.

Make sure to fill everything in completely.

Be ready to share this with your Literature Circle group.

 

 

Students will be organized into their groups (A, B, C, D, E). They will read the book that corresponds with the list (attached below).

 

Students will read the story independently, then work on the Literary Luminary activity sheet.

 

 

Closure: (5 mins)
Pass out sticky notes for students to brainstorm thoughts on the questions below.

Ask students: Has this story changed your mind about anti-hero’s? Do you have negative or sympathetic feelings for them? Why do you think this is?

 

Ask volunteers to share their answers, engage in a class discussion.

Students must take their Literary Luminary activity sheet home if they did not finish in class, in order to be prepare for tomorrow’s group discussion.

 

 

 


3
Set: (10 mins)
Read Aloud: What Would She Do? by Kay Woodward.
Read pages 12-14 about The Trung Sisters.
Read the Question, give students a sticky note or participate in a talk-pair-share with their elbow buddy to discuss what they would do, or what they think the Trung Sisters would do.
After students had time to discuss, read what the Trung Sister’s would actually do.

Development: (45 mins)
Mini Lesson on Word Wizard. (students will already have the literary package, they can follow along as teacher explains the directions)
Directions: After reading the assigned pages or chapters, go back and re-read

the sections looking for words that sparked interest. You can look for words

you didn’t understand, words that were familiar to you, or words that you were curious about. Pick five words from the assigned reading and use them to fill out the chart below. Be ready to share this with your Literature Circle group.
ASK: Does anyone have questions about the Word Wizard criteria before students organize in their literary groups.

Students will organize themselves into a talking circle with their Literary Groups.
Students will take turns sharing their answers from the day before. Tell students to pause after someone has shared to ask questions/make comments. At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

 

Students will begin individually reading the next story on their list and working on the Word Wizard Activity sheet.

Students must take the word wizard sheet home for homework if they did not complete it in classroom time.

 

Closure: (5 mins)
Whole Class Discussion.
ASK- Did anyone find description words for the anti-hero that were similar or different to the way a hero may be described? Why do you think this is?
Students can participate in a talk-pair-share before sharing their answers to the whole class.

 

 

 


4

 

Set (10 mins)
Read Aloud “What Would She Do” by Kay Woodward.
Read pages 20-23 – Joan of Arc.
Ask students the question at the end of the story. Students can independently write on a sticky note what they would do/what they think Joan of Arc would do. Or students can participate in a talk-pair-share with their elbow buddy.
-Share the answer with the students. Ask if anyone has any questions or comments based on her answer.

Development (45 mins)
Mini Lesson on Stellar Summarizer. (students will already have the literary package, they can follow along as teacher explains the directions)
“Directions: After reading the assigned pages or chapters, go back and re-read the

sections looking for important parts, while making sure you know the sequence of

events. Use the section below to write a summary of what you have read.

Be ready to share this with your Literature Circle group.”

Ask if students have any questions about the Stellar Summarizer before letting them organize themselves into a talking circle with their group.

Students will take turns sharing their answers from the day before. Tell students to pause after someone has shared to ask questions/make comments. At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

Students can begin individually reading the next story on their list and working on the stellar summarizer activity.
Students must take home the stellar summarizer activity if they did not finish in class time.

Closure:
Write on the white board Heroes VS Anti-Heroes
Ask: How do heroes change the world and how do anti-heroes change the world?
Have students write their answers on a sticky note and place it up on the board when they are finished. (ask them to put their names on the back side for a formative assessment)

 

 

 


5
Set (10 mins)
Read Aloud – What Would She Do? By Kay Woodward.
Read pages – 56-57 Amelia Earhart.
Ask the question at the end of the story. Students can participate in a talk-pair-share before volunteering their answers.
OR – Ask students why they think Amelia Earhart is a hero.

 

Development: (45 mins)
Mini Lesson on Adventuring Artist:
“Directions: After reading the assigned pages or chapters, go back and re-read

the sections you found the most interesting.

Pick your favorite part and illustrate it!

Be prepared to share this with your Literature Circle group!”
Ask students if they have any questions about the Adventuring Artist criteria before they organize themselves into a talking circle in their literary groups.

 

Students will take turns sharing their answers from the day before. Tell students to pause after someone has shared to ask questions/make comments. At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

 

Students can begin individually reading the next story on their list and working on the Adventuring Artist activity.
Students must take home the Adventuring Artist activity if they did not finish in class time.

 

Closure: (5 mins)
Write on the board HERO and ANTO-HERO
ASK: What are some problems with being a hero? What are some problems with being an anti-hero?
Students can write their answers on a sticky note and place them under each of the words on the board. (ask students to write their names on the back side of the sticky note for a formative assessment/ gauge of understanding)

 

 


6
Set: (10 mins)
Read Aloud “What Would She Do” – by Kay Woodward
Read pages 76-78 – Junko Tabei the Mountain Climber (age 77)
Read the Question and ask students to engage in a talk-pair-share where they will talk about what they think Junko would do and what they think they would do.
OR Ask students what they think about Junko Tabei’s age. Does someone’s age alter their ability to be a hero? Why do they think this? What age are most heroes in the stories/movies they watch? Why do they think this is? What is wrong with this?

 

Development: (45 mins)
Mini Lesson on Discussion Director.
“Directions: After reading the assigned pages or chapters, go back and re-read the sections

looking for important parts. After finding three or four sections, write a few questions to ask

your Literature Circle group. Use the space below to record your questions and answers. You also

need to answer the teacher question about the assigned reading.

Be ready to share these with your Literature Circle group!”

 

Ask if anyone has any questions or concerns about the Discussion Director instructions before students organize themselves into a talking circle with their literary groups.

 

Students will take turns sharing their answers from the day before. Tell students to pause after someone has shared to ask questions/make comments. At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

 

Students can begin individually reading the next story on their list and working on the Discussion Director activity.
Students must take the activity sheet home if they did not finish during class time.

 

Closure (5-10mins)
The discussion Director Activity requires the teacher to ask the students a question.
The Teacher Question is “Does the main character in your story have more heroic qualities or anti-heroic qualities, why do you think this?
Give students time to write this question down and answer it before moving on to the next class.

 

 


7

 

Set (10 mins)

Read Aloud – “What Would She Do?” by Kay Woodward
Read pages 80-83 – Wangari Muta Maathai – Mother of Trees
Read the Question – ask students to engage in a talk-pair-share with their elbow buddy. Ask them to consider what they think Wangari would do and what they would do in that situation.
Read the answer to the students.

Development (45 mins)
Students will organize themselves in their literary groups and engage in a talking circle.
One student will begin asking the group the questions they developed. Students will engage in a group discussion and develop a consensus answer to each of the questions. The individual who is directing the discussion will write their answers down.
This will continue until all discussion directors have finished asking and answering the questions. At the end of the meeting students must all individually fill out the Meeting Review activity sheet before moving on to the next story. (attached below)

 

Closure (5-10 mins)
Group Discussion.
Ask: After reading these 5 anti-hero stories, who is still missing from the anti-hero normative narrative?
Students can participate in a talk-pair-share before answering.
OR. Teacher can handout sticky notes where students can individually write down their answer. (ask students to put their names on the back). Students can place their sticky notes on the board and the teacher can read aloud some of the students answers to initiate a group discussion.

 

 

8

Set (10 mins)
Read Aloud – What Would She Do by Kay Woodward.
Read pages 88-90 – Michelle Obama – Girls Champion
Read the question to students. Students can engage in a talk-pair-share with their elbow buddy. Ask them what they think Michelle would do and what they think they would do. Would you do the same thing as Michelle? Why or why not?
Read the answer- Ask students if they had a similar answer or not.

 

Development (45 mins)
Students will begin their final projects for the unit. (attached below)
Handout the Anti-Hero Writing Project. Go over the Anti-Hero writing prompts and the 7 steps students must take prior to presenting their Anti-Hero Story to the class. Students may begin developing their story map.

Closure (5 mins)
Check in to see what stage of the Writing Project the students are.

 

 

 

 

9 -until students are prepared for their presentations

Set (10 mins)
For the remainder of this unit, continue to begin the lessons by reading a story from “What Would She do” by Kay Woodward.
Read the question – students can participate in a talk-pair-share about what they think the hero would do and inquire what makes this individual a hero.
Answer the question.

Development (45 mins)
Students will continue to work on their Writing Projects using the step-by-step process they were given.

Continue to do this until all students are finished all the Narrative Writing Steps.

When students are finished all the steps and are ready for the presentation. Prior to the presentations – make sure to go through the storytelling skills and rubrics with the students.
(rubrics for everything are attached below)

 

Teacher can plan a lesson that is focused on the Art of Indigenous Story Telling.

Website:
Shannon Thunderbird. Art of Indigenous Storytelling, music, theatre, dance. http://www.shannonthunderbird.com/art_of_indigenous_storytelling.htm

 

Can use this website as a tool to share Indigenous Oral Stories. This is a good opportunity for students to compare and contrast myth’s and true stories.

Closure (5 mins)
Before the end of each lesson – do a check in with students to see what stage they are that. If some students are falling behind make sure to give them extra time to catch up or have them take it home for homework to stay on track.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade 6 Activity One – What is a hero? What is an anti-hero?

 

Definitions:
Hero-

 

 

 

Anti-hero-

 

 

 

 

Mind Maps
BRAINSTORM – Who is a hero? What do they look like? What personality traits do they have? What do they do that makes them a hero?

 

 

 

 

 

 

HERO

 

 

 

 

 

 

BRAINSTORM – Who is an anti-hero? What do they look like? What personality traits do they have? What do they do that makes them a hero?

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANTI-HERO

 

 

Grade 6 Literature Circles

 

 

 

Name____________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Loewen Stories – The Rise of the Anti-Hero

 

Literature Circle Group
Group A

Monday: The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All
Tuesday: Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All
Wednesday: Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All
Thursday: Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All
Friday: Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All

 

Group B

Monday: Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All
Tuesday: The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All
Wednesday: Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All
Thursday: Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All
Friday: Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All

 

Group C

Monday: Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All

Tuesday: Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All
Wednesday: The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All
Thursday: Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All
Friday: Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All

 

Group D

Monday: Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All

Tuesday: Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All
Wednesday: Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All
Thursday: The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All Friday: Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All

Group E

Monday: Blame the Boys – Helen of Troy Tells All

Tuesday: Tricked by The Kids – Cronus the Titan Tells All
Wednesday: Beauty Missing, Hair Hissing – Medusa Tells All
Thursday: Not the Curious Kind – Pandora Tells All
Friday: The Way Eye See It – Cyclops Tells All

 

 

 

 

 

All of these short stories have similar themes of understanding others.    

In the world we live in today, it’s more important than ever before that we learn to understand each other. Differences should be embraced, and you can make a difference when it comes to bullying and intolerance.

 

Planning Time:

  • Agree on at least 3 “Group Beliefs” that your group will be held to during meeting. Write them on the next page.   Our Beliefs:                 Date_________________________ 
  • Individual Report
  • Meeting #_________
  • Meeting Review
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Our group has decided on the following beliefs to be held to throughout Literature Circles.
  • Group Beliefs
Skill Yes No Notes
My reading for this meeting was complete.

 

     
My role page was completed with my best effort.      
I came to my meeting with my novel and my duo-tang.      
I used my time wisely and helped my group accomplish our tasks.      

 

Group Report

What worked well in your group today? Was there anyone specific who did an amazing job today? Explain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What needed improvement in your group today? Was there anyone specific was holding your group back today? Explain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What was one specific way that you helped your group today? Explain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELA 6
Tales, Heroes, Deeds and Wonders Narrative Writing

 

Grade 6 –
I can write a clear multi-paragraph composition of at least 400 words.

 

I can create a narrative-composition that establishes plot, setting, point of view, and developed characters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anti-Hero Writing Project

This writing piece will be made up of several different parts to take us through the writing process. We will go through the rubrics for the Story Map, Storyboard, Good Copy and Presentation together in class.

 

Pre-writing – Story Map
You will use a class to brainstorm an individual story map as part of your pre-writing. You also, of course, may choose to use one of your other brainstorming or pre-writing tools on your own- such as a list, web or illustration. The Story Map maps out the main aspects of your Anti-Hero Story such as setting, characters, and main points.

 

Pre-Writing – Story Board
The Story Board will be a collection of 6 key events in your Anti-Hero Story. You will sketch an illustration and provide a small written explanation of each event. This will help ensure your story is well thought out prior to starting your draft.

 

Drafting – Rough Draft in Writing Journal
Your first draft of your Anti-Hero story in your writing journal. This should be 3-5 well-organized paragraphs, with the structure and detail of an Anti-Hero Story.

Revising & Editing – Self and Peer Edits
Done in writing journal, you will re-read and revise your own draft first. A peer will then edit your work using a peer edit check-list.

 

Good Copy- Typed

Your good copy will be typed on a computer.

 

Presentation
We will be practicing our storytelling skills through presenting your Anti-Hero Story! We will be going over story telling skills together as a class prior to your presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anti-Hero Story Writing Prompts:

 

You are going to create an Anti-Hero story. Reflect on the Hero and Anti-Hero stories we have read in this unit. Consider these writing prompts during the process of creating your Anti-Hero story.

 

 

  • Who is your Anti-Hero? What makes them an Anti-Hero?
  • What does your Anti-Hero: Look like? Sound like? Act like? (Personality/attitude qualities)
  • Do they look, sound and act like a “typical” anti-hero? Why or why not?
  • Is your Anti-Hero commonly misunderstood by others? What do they do to overcome this?
  • What makes your Anti-Hero unique?
  • How does your Anti-Hero deal with challenges and problems?
  • What personal values does your Anti-Hero have? And how does this relate to their identity?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literature Circles Rubrics

Name____________________________       Group _________     Meeting # ________

Role

CR6.1- I can read, comprehend, and respond to texts that address identity and social responsibility.

CR6.2- I can select and use appropriate strategies to gather meaning before, during, and after reading.

  TS BD DE EU
Evidence from the Text Little to no evidence to support thoughts. More instruction and practice needed. Ideas are supported with adequate evidence from text. Examples could be expanded, or quotes included. Ideas are fully supported with examples/quotes from text. Student has drawn from the book well to fulfill their role. All ideas are extremely well supported with many examples or quotes drawing from the text.
Understanding of the Text Inaccurate or irrelevant details indicate a serious misunderstanding of the passage. Evidence given is relevant and accurate but the student does not extend beyond the basic level of comprehension. Evidence is relevant and accurate. It is clear student is using skills that show meaningful comprehension. All evidence Is relevant and accurate. Student goes above and beyond to show deep comprehension.
Organization and Details The organization of this response makes it difficult to assess the student. Role may not be complete. Responses are scattered and not sequential. Thoughts and evidence do not connect and there is little detail. The entry flows in and is easy for the reader to follow. Thoughts are connected to evidence. Student has paid attention to detail and completed the role thoroughly. The entry flows and is easy to follow. Student has gone above and beyond with the thoroughness of their role and has included many details.

 

Meeting Reflection

AR6.2- I can appraise and reflect on my own reading skills and strategies

AR6.3- I can appraise my own and others’ work for clarity.

  TS BD DE EU
 

 

 

Reflection

Reflection is not completed. Reflection is completed. Responses show little thought and have few details. Is not completed thoroughly. Reflection is completed with thoughtful and thorough responses. Reflection shows deep thought and reflection on the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name:_____________________________

Anti-Hero Writing Project

 

Story Map Rubric

4 3 2 1
Story Map Shows great attention to detail in descriptions. Shows very strong knowledge of Anti-Hero structures. Shows attention to detail in descriptions. Shows strong knowledge of Anti-Hero story structures. Descriptions are present but not detailed or informative. Shows little knowledge of Anti-Hero structures. Story map is incomplete. Shows minimal knowledge of Anti-Hero story structures.

 

 

 

 

Storyboard Rubric

4 3 2 1
Key Ideas All scenes and descriptions are extremely detailed, and progress in a logical fashion. Scenes and descriptions are detailed, and progress in a logical fashion. Many scenes and descriptions are not detailed, and may not progress in a logical fashion. Scenes and/or descriptions are missing or incomplete.
Presentation Work is extremely detailed, neat, colourful, and eye-catching. Work is detailed, neat, colourful, and eye-catching. Work is minimally detailed, neat, colourful, or eye-catching. Work is not detailed, neat, colourful, or eye-catching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anti-Hero Writing Rubric

4 3 2 1
Introduction Develops and provides insight into the setting and characters in the introduction paragraph. Develops setting and characters in the introduction paragraph. Simple beginning sentences describe setting and characters. Simple or no beginning sentence stating setting and characters.
Organization Three or more well developed events organized into paragraphs. Three developed events organized into paragraphs. Three events organized into a paragraph. Events are unorganized and hard to follow.
Conclusion Developed conclusion in a well organized paragraph that explains the ending of the story. Conclusion in a paragraph that explains the ending of the story. Simple concluding sentences that tell the ending of the story. Simple or no concluding sentences telling the end of the story.
Elements of Anti-Hero Stories Includes all elements of Anti-Hero Stories Includes many elements of Anti-Hero Stories Includes some elements of Anti-Hero Stories Includes few or no elements of Anti-Hero Stories
Conventions There are few or no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. . There are few spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. They do not interfere with meaning. There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft. The may interfere with meaning. The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors. They interfere with meaning.

 

Name____________________________ Story Title __________________________________________

Comments:

 

 

Anti-Hero Storytelling Rubric

4 3 2 1
Knowledge of Story The storyteller knows the story well and has obviously practiced telling the story several times. There is no need for notes and the speaker speaks with confidence. The storyteller knows the story pretty well and has practiced telling the story. May need notes once or twice, but the speaker is confident. The storyteller knows some of the story, but did not appear to have practiced. May need notes 3-4 times, and the speaker appears ill-at-ease. The storyteller could not tell the story without using notes.
Voice Always speaks loudly, slowly and clearly. Is easily understood by all audience members all the time Usually speaks loudly, slowly and clearly. Is easily understood by all audience members almost all the time. Usually speaks loudly and clearly. Sometimes speaks too fast for audience to understand. Speaks too softly or mumbles. The audience often has trouble understanding.
Acting/dialogue The student uses consistent voices and facial expressions to make the characters more believable and the story more easily understood. The student often uses voices and facial expressions to make the characters more believable and the story more easily understood. The student tries to use voices and facial expressions to make the characters more believable and the story more easily understood. The student tells the story but does not use voices or facial expressions to make the storytelling more interesting or clear.
Pacing The story is told slowly where the storyteller wants to create suspense and told quickly when there is a lot of action. The storyteller usually paces the story well, but one or two parts seem to drag or to be rushed. The storyteller tries to pace the story, but the story seems to drag or be rushed in several places. The storyteller tells everything at one pace. Does not change the pace to match the story.

 

Name____________________________ Story Title __________________________________________

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Teacher Resources

 

Friebrun, M. Literature Circle Roles. California, US. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Tales-From-A-Very-Busy-Teacher/Category/Writing-133466

Lewlove, K. (1998) Tales – Heroes, deeds, and wonders. Teacher’s Resource Module. Scarborough, Ont. Prentice Hall Ginn Canada.

Winch, G., Johnston, R. R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2014). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature. 5th Edition. South Melbourne, AUS: Oxford University Pres.

Wong, H. k., & Wong, R.T. (2004) The first days of school – How to be an effective teacher. Harry K. Wong Publications.

 

Student Resources

Benson, R. (1998). Tales: Heroes, deeds and wonders. Scarborough, Ont. Prentice Hall Ginn Canada.

Loewen, N. (2014). The way eye see it – Cyclops tells all. North Mankato, MN. Picture Window Books.

Loewen, N. (2014). Blame the boys – Helen of Troy tells all. North Mankato, MN. Picture Window Books.

Loewen, N. (2014). Tricked by the kids – Cronus the Titan tells all. North Mankato, MN. Picture Window Books.

Loewen, N. (2014). Beauty missing, hair hissing – Medusa tells all. North Mankato, MN. Picture Window Books.

Loewen, N. (2014). Not the curious kind – Pandora tells all. North Mankato, MN. Picture Window Books.

Wilson, G.W., & Alphona, A. (2014). Ms. Marvel: No Normal. Marvel Comics.

Woodward, K. (2018). What Would She Do? 25 True Stories of Trailblazing Rebel Women. Broadway, New York, NY. Scholastic Inc.

Thunderbird, S. Art of Indigenous Storytelling, music, theatre, dance. http://www.shannonthunderbird.com/art_of_indigenous_storytelling.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre Internship - Middle Years, WRITTEN REFLECTIONS

PRE-INTERNSHIP 3 WEEK BLOCK #WHOHASTHEPOWER

WEEK ONE

This week the grade 6 and 7’s began their power and authority unit. #WHOHASTHEPOWER
The grade 6’s worked on the outcome PA6.1 Examine the relationship between an individual’s power and authority and the power and authority of others.
We inquired about guiding questions such as: What are the different forms of power? (Force, Influence and Authority) What are the characteristics of effective leaders? How do leaders lead? Why does conflict happen? What are my own roles and responsibilities as a student?

The grade 7’s worked on the outcome PA7.1 Compare the sources of power for individuals, nations, and regions in a selection of Pacific Rim and circumpolar countries.
We inquired about guiding questions such as: What is democracy? How can democracy be improved? What are the different sources of power? How were treaties formed?

Planning and Instructional Strategies:
This week I have recognized that I need to work on my lesson plan timing. I almost always over plan my lessons and I am learning quickly that there is not possibly enough time to teach everything I want to in such a short amount of time. I need to prioritize the learning tasks that will best help students reach the intended learning outcomes of the Saskatchewan Curriculum. As I am beginning to develop relationships with my students and recognizing their learning needs, I am developing an understanding on how much time they need to work on and finish a learning task. I was hoping that we would finish PA6.1 and PA7.1 during my first week in the classroom, but unfortunately the learning tasks will be carrying over to next week. I am hoping that we will be able to finalize their learning of this outcome by Monday.

I have had the opportunities to implement a variety of Instructional Strategies in my classroom. So far I have used technological videos, read-alouds, computer research, mind-maps, textbooks, venn-diagrams, Frayer Model organizer, group and individual work, and talk-pair shares. All of which I believe will be beneficial to use in my future classroom!

PDP (Professional Development Plans)
This week I have worked on communication skills, classroom management skills and waiting it out. If you know me, you know that I do not have an over-bearing voice that students will easily respond to. Therefor, it is a necessity for me to use differential classroom management strategies that will help me keep the classroom under control. The classroom I am pre-interning in has a bad case of the blurts. They all have incredible ideas and inquiries, but it is simply impossible to get to them all without a structure set in place.  I chose to implement a sticky note blurt prevention strategy, where each student is given three sticky notes at the beginning of each class. I encourage the students to write their ideas and thoughts down before they raise their hands. Although I have only used this for a few days now, I have found that it has substantially decreased the amount of blurts. Plus, students regularly catch themselves blurting because they know that they should have written something down before raising their hands and speaking. I am definitely going to continue using this strategy for as long as it continues to work.

The second biggest professional development strategy I need to continue working on is waiting it out. I need to make sure I have all eyes on me prior to giving instruction to ensure all students are engaged and are listening. I find that I am good at doing this at the beginning of the lesson, but by the end of the day I tend to lose control of the class. This is definitely something I need to continue to practice during my 3-week block.

Next Week Goals:
1.  Continue to work on my professional development plans. I want to introduce and practice a variety of classroom management ideas to discover what works best for me as a future teacher. I have brought my rain stick with me everyday but I continuously forget to use it. My goal is to take it out during my lesson and let the rain fall if the classroom noise gets out of control.

2. I need to prioritize the most beneficial learning tasks for my students next week. This includes choosing what I am going to use as a summative assessment for each of the Power and Authority outcomes. Thus far my goal is to have a final project where students answer questions from each of the Power and Authority Unit outcomes, but I am nervous there wont be enough time for this.

3. I have organized a special guest to come into our classroom next Friday. Shailynn Taylor, a dear friend of mine was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Dystrophy (SMA) as a young child. She is going to share with me and my class the ways that Power and Authority has influenced her life. She is going to talk about her life and how she became a social justice advocate and speaker for the SMA community. Most importantly, she is going to share her story about her journey of receiving a life saving drug called Spinraza. A few weeks ago, the Canadian government came to a conclusion that only individuals who meet a specific criteria will be able to receive funding for this drug. Shailynn does not meet the requirements. That is why she wants to share with us the roles the Federal, Provincial and Municipal governments, including the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how they influence her quality of life.  I am beyond thankful for the opportunity to bring someone like Shailynn in my pre-internship classroom.

WRITTEN REFLECTIONS

WAYS TO RESPOND . . .

Don’t lecture kids – use one-liners and ask them why it is wrong

What would you say if…

Kids tattling: are you telling me to help Johnny or hurt Johnny?

Kid interrupts you in class… would you like to explain to the class- be careful with this one, make them a leader, my job is to explain and your job is to listen, if it is continual pull off to the side and see what is going on and get to the root of the problem – get kids that have a lot to say to write thoughts on sticky notes or in their journal, set goals – has to put a check mark if interrupted and can only have so many check marks, use headphones as way to close off the noise,

Kids swearing… get to root, ask what happened,

If a kid calls another a name… Remind them of the beliefs (what do we believe about calling other people names) redo, remind them of how painful that is, we want kind words in our classroom, “not here” (you might do that out there, but not here,

Kid that always stays after school… give them that attention they need, establish the best time to do this, want that student to be strong and independent, explain to them that you want them to interact with other kids (ask if there is maybe bullying or something going on at home that this is the reason), get to the root

A kid is always showing anger- See what else is going on, get kids to walk it off (page principle or someone to help), a big part of it is just listening,

***ask why when you hear window words*** (verbal and nonverbal)

One-liners…

– A kid is yelling “thank you for showing me that your upset”

– won’t stop talking “one minute… ill come back to you “(then remember and go back)

– Storyteller kid “Can you write that down for me?”

– Say something sensitive “thank you for trusting me. Let’s talk more about this…”

– A kid says “shut up” to another “my job… your job…”

“I can see your really upset, tell me what happened” – write it down and don’t interrupt (getting them from emotional brain to logical brain).

“I can see why your upset, let’s fix it”

WRITTEN REFLECTIONS

STRENGTH BASED STRATEGIES

Presentation by Donna Nikiforuk

  • Seeing the greatness in every child…
  • Reclaiming youth – finding strengths in students.
  • Fair does not mean equal (we need to meet the needs of our students)
  •  Good Teacher Behaviour: calm, joking, offer to help, fairness, smiling, explaining, polite
  • Look for what the students have done right
  • ***Don’t ask why- Ask what happened***
  • Appeal to the inner child
  • Switch from rules to beliefs (What do we believe we need to have a good classroom – make a classroom believe board)
  • CIRCLE OF COURAGE (belonging, mastery, independence, generosity)
  • Respond to students needs rather than reacting to the problems
  • Don’t get into a power struggle
  • Ways to help students belong: okay to make mistakes and fix it, help students be the best they can be, allow “do-overs”, is this helping or hurting someone?, follow up- what can we do to make it better
  • *language is everything*
  • “you are valuable”
  • Hurt people, Hurt people
  • Give kids opportunities to find their gifts
  • “caught ya” bin – get your names entered when you do a good thing
  • 5 needs: survival, belonging, fun, freedom and power
  • ***be the teacher students can count on***
WRITTEN REFLECTIONS

10 HABBITS TO GET INTO

  1. Treat all students with integrity
  2. Plan interest based lessons that capture attention
  3. Correct the behaviour, not the student
  4. Use powerful language – positive, encouraging, reinforcing
  5. Teach students about routines and procedures to evoke predictability
  6. Laugh with students
  7. Greet students at the door with a smiling face
  8. Take interest surveys to get to know your students
  9. Know all your student’s names
  10. Talk with your students individually

    – Donna Nikiforuk (strength based strategies presentation)

WRITTEN REFLECTIONS

PROFESSIONAL GOALS SET FOR NEXT SEMESTER

Goals that are influenced from my COOP’s feedback:

  • Be aware of students engagement. Is everyone paying attention/listening/on task?
  • Set talking expectations. Be aware of blurters – need to hear what all students know and want to share
  • Be aware of overdependent learners – need to give them opportunities for self development
  • How do I expect my learners to work? (volume, placement, etc. )
  • Work on transitions from one activity to the next. Redo transitions if they do not go smoothly
  • Hold students accountable for my expectations
  • Say “I need you to” instead of “you should be doing this”
  • Pay attention to off task students
  • When giving instructions ensure all students attention is on me

Goals that are influenced from this semesters classes:

  • Use more holistic breaks in the classroom. Take ideas from my EHE class and try them out.
  • Do more research on Differentiated Learning Strategies and practice them in my placement.
  • Do more research on appropriately implementing Indigenous Ways of Knowing and implement them in my placement.
  • Implement Inquiry activities in my placement
  • Implement drama activities to integrate cross-curricular content. – Help reach differentiated learners needs.
RESOURCES

HOLISTIC LEARNING BREAKS

EHE 310: Professional Learning Community

Holistic Health Learning Breaks

 

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Breaks Template

Name: Amy Chapman

Targeted Grade Level:  7/8

Description of Active Task:

  • Begin with speaking to the different areas of holistic health this activity addresses
  • Read the short paragraph on slide two, ask questions for deeper understanding e.g. how does this poster speak to you?  What are the underlying messages? How can you relate this to your life?
  • Play the link WE LOVE TREES (for the younger grades) a short storybook read to help younger learners begin to think about how trees affect our daily lives, what benefits they offer, how we are connected
  • Show the flow and grow yoga position page so the learners can visually understand the pose they will be doing (note the adaptations for a less advanced stance)
  • Explain the process, have the students spread out to a spot they’re comfortable in and stand hip width apart, both feet planted firmly on the ground
  • Have them close their take three deep breaths, raising their arms at their sides and over their heads breathing rhythmically and slow
  • While they are doing this, read the “questions to consider” on slide 5  e.g. Visualize a tree, where is it? What are the surroundings like? What season is it?…..etc.
  • Now, after they have done three breaths and thought about the questions silently, have them transition into tree pose
  • Spend 30 seconds on each leg.  Tell the students they can close their eyes for a more advanced challenge to their balance
  • After 30 seconds on each leg, have them return to the starting position, feet hip width apart, planted firmly on the ground and take three deep breaths again
  • Have the learners return to their desks and either draw a picture or write about their yoga experience and the tree they envisioned.

 

              

Supportive Resources (optional):

https://www.deviantart.com/praxedesart/art/Yoga-Tree-Pose-714079325 – Slide 1 Tree Pose

https://www.flowandgrowkidsyoga.com/blog/2016/7/23/yoga-poses-for-kids-tree-pose – Slide 3 Flow and Grow

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBZUKKGEeNw – YouTube Children’s book WE LOVE TREES

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s): 2-4

  • See the flow and grow slide: have the learners leave a foot on the ground for support and simply lift the heel
  • Show the WE LOVE TREES YouTube video to help focus the class on the purpose of the body break

 

 

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Mental: Deeper thinking about the meaning of the activity and the connection through visualization to their own life experiences

Spiritual: The connection between themselves and the tree, connection to Mother Earth and the roots that plant a tree to withstand life’s storms (poster shown on slide 2)what season spoke to the learner and the seasons of life.

Physical: The challenge of balance, spatial awareness

Emotional: Does the meditative visualization represent the learners’ current emotional state? Refocuses and directs the learners’ minds to a creative space allowing for deeper thought process

_______________________________________________________________________________

Name: Glenn Sawatzky

Targeted Grade Level: 7

“The Four Corners Emotional Intelligence Activity”

 

Description of Active Task:

  1.   Prepare the room by placing an object or image in each corner of the room. These can be chosen based on a theme (nature, art, etc.), but need not be.
  2.   Allow one or two minutes for students to walk around and observe each object or image.
  3.   Ask students to move toward the object or image they identify with most strongly.
  4.   Once students have settled into their corners, invite one or two people to share the reason behind their choice.
  5.   Ask students to look around the room at the other objects or images and the people gathered in other corners.
  6.   Have students reflect on how their chosen object or image might interact positively with an object or image from a different corner. Have students move toward the new corner of their choice.
  7.   Have one or two students share about the interaction between their first object and their second object.

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

Some of the more challenging cognitive elements could be excised or simplified for students in early primary grades. Steps 6 and 7, for example, to be left out. Objects could be chosen for their simplicity in form where fewer metaphorical connections are expected to be made. For example, a teacher could place four uniquely coloured stones in the corners of the room. A Grade One class could sort itself according to which colour each student feels most connected to. Follow up questions might then be more basic, but nevertheless require cognitive processing and emotional awareness. Why did you choose the blue stone? How does blue make you feel? Follow up questions could be designed to prompt reflection on a spirit of unity despite difference.  The stones were all different, but in what ways were they the same?

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Spirit: As students reflect on the interconnectedness between seemingly disparate objects (step 6), they are led into an awareness of being bound together in one spirit. If the objects/images are nature-themed, the message of finding our place within earth’s natural order (an emerging eco-spirituality) may also be emphasized.

Body: Students must be aware of their movements through confined space; they must navigate the physical pathways of their choosing without conflict or injury.

Emotion: The initial selection task is an exercise in personal emotional awareness as students analyze and sort through their initial reactions to each object or image. As students look around the room from their chosen corners (step 5), empathy is required to consider how someone who has made a different choice might feel differently in that moment.

Mind: The mind is engaged through the mental agility required to perform (even to oneself) a justification for the choice of object (step 4). Students must use their higher cognitive processes to put into words what may have begun as a sense or feeling. Ingenuity is also required as are asked to create points of connection between the first and second objects chosen (step 6).

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Breaks Template

Name: Larissa Friesen

Targeted Grade Level: Grade 3 – Plant a Bean

Description of Active Task:

  •         Ask students at the beginning to see if they can state what a plant in our gardens need to grow
  •         Ask them if they have a garden and what they grow and if they plant a garden with anyone
  •         Introduce song
  •         Lyrics are “Can you plant a bean, watch it grow up big and green. Can you water the seed, pull out the weeds. Can you shine like the sun, pick pods one by one. Working is done, now let’s eat the bean”
  •         Actions can be found at the below link, or add some of your own.
  •         Slowly get faster as it goes on
  •         Talk about your feelings when it rains? When you have to pick weeds? When you plant seeds? When you see the plants grow?

Supportive Resources (optional):

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

  •         For younger grades you may not want to speed up at all and just sing it a few times over so that they can all sing along
  •         Maybe plant an actual garden
  •         For older grades you may want to add actions for different parts of the song or ask them to see if they can use the song for a different veggie (doesn’t have to be rhyming)

o   For example: Can you plant some lettuce, watch it grow up big and green. Can you water the seed, pull out the weeds, can you shine like the sun, cut it off one by one. Working is done now let’s make some salad.  (This way they can think about things to suggest to grow at home or even about snacks to eat)

 

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

  •         Spiritual: Being about and learning about how the different parts of the world (like rain or sun) help to grow us food and provide for us.
  •         Physical: Moving around, stretching, walking, all areas are working in this dance
  •         Social: Talking about who we would plant a garden with or if you would share the food in the garden. If dad plants the garden does only dad eat it? Or does the whole family eat it?
  •         Emotional: How does planting a garden make you feel? How about picking weeds? How about when it rains?

 

         

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EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Break

Name: Haley Wagar

Targeted Grade Level: Grade Six

Curriculum Connection:  Health Education 6

Outcome: USC 6.1

Indicator a. describe values one appreciates in self.

Description of Active Task:

Step 1: The students will get out of their desks and partner with someone that does not sit at their discussion table.

Step 2: I (the facilitator) will explain the learning break. The game is called sculptor and clay. One partner will be the sculptor and the other person will be the clay. The sculptor cannot use any words to mould their clay. Instead, the clay will mirror the sculptor, sculpting only one body part at a time, until the clay has been positioned where the sculptor desires.

Step 3: I will explain that the theme of the sculpture is spirit animals. Each sculptor will mould their clay into an animal that they feel best represents themself.

Step 4:  I will ask the students if they know what a spirit animal is to clarify what they are sculpting. I will tell them, a spirit animal is an animal in which you feel a personal connection to, or associate yourself with. Your spirit animal often has qualities and attributes that you see in yourself. Your spirit animal should represent a positive aspect of yourself.

Step 5: Sculptors will have a minute and a half to sculpt their clay. Once the sculptor has the clay in a position that represents their spirit animal, the clay will remain still and the sculptor will raise their hand signalling that they have completed their sculpture.

Step 6: Once all the sculptors have their hand raised, they will do a gallery walk to admire all the sculptures that have been created.

Step 7: The sculptor will return to their masterpiece, and if the sculptor feels comfortable they will share what animal they chose as their spirit animal and why. At this time the sculptures can become human again and relax.

Step 8: The sculptor and clay will switch roles and repeat the activity, so everyone in the room has the opportunity to be a sculpture and sculptor.

Supportive Resources:

http://www.spiritanimal.info

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

o   To adapt this activity for a younger grade (grade 3) you could allow the sculptor to talk to their clay in addition to mirroring. This makes the sculpting process less challenging.  You could also adapt the activity by changing the theme. Instead of sculpting spirit animals, you could sculpt something that’s you happy, or an emotion you are feeling.

o   To adapt this activity for older grades (grade 8/9), the sculptor can only use words to mould their clay. They have to understand and use movement language regarding space, and body.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

o   Emotional: Students have to think of a positive attribute of themselves, and they get to listen to other students’ positive attributes.

o   Mental (cognitive thinking): Students have to think creatively about what animal they feel a connection to and be able to explain why they feel that animal represents them.

o   Physical: students are moving various body parts, and during the gallery walk students are moving around the classroom space.

o   Spiritual: Students identify with something outside of their own body. They feel connected to the animal they have chosen, and are able to explain why.

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Break

Name: Amber Koza-Drimmie Vibert

Targeted
Grade Level: Grade 2

Health
Education 2

Outcome:
USC 2.2

Description
of Active Task:

Step 1: Have
Students get out of their desks, move desks to the walls and sit in a circle
with legs stretched out so that feet are touching.

Step 2: I
will then explain the Learning Break.
The exercise is called “Pizza.”
Together we are going to go through the process of making an imaginary
pizza.

Step 3: I
will ask the students if anyone knows what a pizza is.  I will ask one of the students (if anyone raises
their hand) to explain what a pizza is.

Step 4:  Once everyone is ready I will explain that in
the pizza exercise we mix and roll out our imaginary dough together.  Then each person will take a turn picking a ‘topping’
for our pizza.  These can sometimes get
pretty wild and crazy!

Step 5: After
each topping the students will all put the ‘topping’ on their pizza, making
sure to reach as far to the middle as possible so as not to miss any area.

Step 6: When
we have gone through the whole circle, we will put our imaginary pizza in the
oven and stretch.

Step 7: When we finish our stretch, we will pull our imaginary pizza out of the oven.

Adaptations
for other Grade Level(s):

  •        adaptations could include making different type of food (example
    fruit salad)
  •         It could be adapted to older students by going in depth about what foods are healthy and what foods are not and why.

Connection
to Holistic Wellness:

  • Emotional: Students can connect over foods they may or may not
    like and get a sense of belonging.
  • Mental (cognitive thinking): Students have to come up with ideas
    for the pizza.
  • Physical: Students are stretching their bodies.
  • Spiritual: Students can get involved in storytelling about why
    they like certain foods and why they do not like others.

 

 

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Break

Name: Rachel Baber

Targeted Grade Level: 2

Description of Active Task:

  •   Tell students it is now time for a quick break so we will begin by getting up out of our seats and pushing in our chairs because we are no longer humans for the next few minutes; we are animals!
  •   First, we are going to take a dive into the ocean because we are dolphins!  So, move around the room as though you are a dolphin swimming through the ocean.
  •   What sounds do dolphins make?  How does it feel to swim and dive in the ocean?
  •   Next, we are going to travel to the African desert because we are lions!  We are going to move around the classroom as though we are lions searching for our next prey.
  •   How does a lion move?  What facial expressions might we use to show a lion searching for prey?
  •   Now we are taking a trip to the Amazon Rainforest because we are monkeys!  Now there’s lots of trees in the rainforest and remember monkeys love to swing from branch to branch so give it a try!
  •   What sounds do monkeys make?  Monkeys love to have fun and be silly so let’s try that!
  •   We are now moving to the sky because we are birds!  Spread your wings and fly through the sky!
  •   Are you a big bird or a small bird?  How does it feel to fly?
  •   Lastly, we are going to land in the jungle and as soon as our feet hit the ground we are now elephants!
  •   Do elephants move fast or slow?  How does it feel to move like an elephant?
  •   As we walk like elephants we are going to find our way back to our seats and once we get there you may sit down.

Adaptations for another Grade Level(s):

To adapt this activity to an older grade level I would make the animals more complex such a sea turtle, hyena, sloth, eagle, and jaguar.  To advance the level further I could have the students brainstorm animals that live in each ecosystem first which would test their knowledge (i.e. ocean, desert, rainforest, air, and jungle animals).  Rather than basic questions asked about how they’re feeling, what sounds they make, etc. the questions could be: “How many legs does this animal have and how does that impact the way they walk?” “How does this animal breathe?” “What does this animal prey on?” “Who preys on this animal?”.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Physical:

           Throughout this activity we are up and out of our seats and moving around the room in some way.  We are stretching our arms and legs out in different ways in order to reflect the way each animal moves.  We may be jumping, crouching, spinning, etc.  All this movement reflects the physical dimension of holistic wellness.

Emotional

-As the children are carrying out this activity I am continually asking them to address the emotions they are acting out.  This allows the students to reflect on their own emotions and perhaps be able to connect to how they are feeling in that moment even if it’s subconsciously.  Even if they are feeling sad, angry, or stressed before the exercise, hopefully by the end they will feel better because they had to act happy at a few different points.  We end with an elephant which is calm because it will bring the students back to a state that they will be able to focus and work in.

Mental

           Students are engaged in their mental dimension because they must recall what they know about each animal in various ways.  They must think about how this animal moves, how many legs it has, if it flies, swims, or walks, if it’s large or small, etc.  I also get the students to make the sound the animal makes at certain points which again tests their knowledge of the animal.  Their minds are constantly engaged in this exercise because they are not just copying something from a video or picture, they are required to act it out from their own memory.

Spiritual

-This activity relates to the spiritual dimension because it is all about animals that exist in nature.  The spiritual connection to animals is made because we are actually becoming the animal and putting ourselves in the place of the animal.  It allows the students to think as though they are this animal which brings them closer to it then if they were to just talk about it.  Even if this spiritual connection is subconscious and not addressed directly, it is still very much present during this exercise.

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Breaks Template

Name: Alyssa Grondin

Targeted Grade Level: Grade 5

Curriculum Connection: Health Education

Outcome: USC5.7

Indicator (c)recognize and describe varying levels of intensity of personal feelings.

Description of Active Task:

Step one: Tell the students it is time for a brain break.  The brain break is called creative compliments.

Step two: Place index cards in front of each student before you start.

Step three: After that, return to the front of the class and get their attention for a brief instruction and model the next part one of the body break.

Step four:On your card, I want each of you to write down, in point form five things that you love about yourself. For instance, I love my hair, I love my smile, I love my cooking, I love my clothes, and I love my creativity. I am going to give you 45 seconds.

Step five:Times up, pencils down, stand up with your card in your hand.

Step six:Students will work on building class moral through complimenting their classmates.

Step seven: instruct everyone to walk around the room, your objective is to exchange 6 high-fives with your classmates.  Before exchanging a high-five with your classmate, you must give them compliment, and they must give you one back.  I love your necklace, I love your jacket, high-five. Use Amy as a demonstration.

Step eight:When you are finished giving your high-fives, tell everyone to freeze.  Sit down whenever you are, and crossed your legs.

Step nine:I (the facilitator) will lead the students through a brief meditation.

Step ten:Okay grade fives, I want everyone to cross your legs, put on your lap, close your eyes and take a deep breath in and out.

Step eleven:I (the facilitator) will then walk around the room posing questions and statements for students to think about during the meditation.

  1. “Think about the one compliment that you wrote down that you loved about yourself.”
  2. “Think about a compliment that you gave to another classmate.”
  3. “How did receiving compliments make you feel?”
  4. “In your mind, I want you to give yourself 3 more compliments.
  5.  Everybody let’s take one final cleansing breathe in, and let’s blow it out.
  6. You may open your eyes, take your index cards, and return to your desk.

Adaptations for another Grade Level(s):

To adapt this to younger grade level I would omit writing on the index card completely and move right into the high-fiving and complimenting exercise. For an older grade, instead of limiting it to five things that you love about yourself, have students write as many compliments as they could in 45 seconds.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Physical:During this exercise, students are out of their desks, and moving around the classroom.  They are using their arms, and their hands to exchange high-fives with their classmates.

Emotional:Students must think of five positives that they love about themselves, and write them down.

Mental:(cognitive thinking): Students have to think creatively about giving a compliment to their classmate.  This activity demonstrates how the students feel about themselves, and their classmates. Their minds are constantly engaged in this exercise because as they are required to think on their own

Spiritual:Students must clear their minds, relax, and practice mindfulness at the end of the break.  They must reflect on all the different compliments they received, and how the compliments made them feel.  We ended by complimenting ourselves three more times.

 

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Breaks Template

Name: Cassandra Busch

Targeted Grade Level: Grade 5 (could be done with grades 3-8)

Description of Active Task:

Body Scan Script

1) Lie down on your back. Let your legs and your arms relax and fall to the sides. Settle yourself in a comfortable position and close your eyes.

2) Start by taking two or three gentle, large breaths. Pay attention to how that feels. Your belly rises and falls. Air moves in and out of your body. If you like, place a hand on your belly and feel it move with each breath.

3) Now we’re going to pay attention to the other parts of the body. Start with your feet. They might feel warm or cold, wet or dry, relaxed or restless. It’s also okay if you feel nothing at all. If you can, relax your feet now. If that’s hard to do, that’s fine. Take a moment and notice how that feels too.

4) For these few minutes, let yourself be still. There’s nothing to do. Pay attention as best you can. You might feel a blanket or socks on your feet, or you might feel them pressing against the bed or the floor. When your mind gets busy, gently bring your attention back to your feet again.

5) Now move your attention to your lower legs, noticing whatever is there. Do they feel heavy, light, warm, cold, or something else? Let go of frustration and trying to do anything. Just do your best and give yourself a few moments of rest.

Next, move your attention next to your knees and relax them. Feel the front, back, and sides of your knees.

6) After a few more breaths, move your attention to your upper legs. Whatever you feel, or don’t feel, is fine. Notice your legs and let them relax. If you feel restless or wiggly, that’s okay too. That happens.

7) Now move your attention to your belly. It always moves when you breathe, rising and falling, like waves on the sea. You might feel something on the inside, like full or hungry. You might notice the touch of your clothing or a blanket. You might even feel emotions in your belly, like happy or sad or upset.

If you feel that it’s hard to focus, that’s normal. Gently practice coming back again and again to how your chest feels when you breathe.

8) Next, bring your attention to your chest. Notice it rising and falling as you breathe. If you feel that it’s hard to focus, that’s normal. Gently practice coming back again and again to how your chest feels when you breathe.

9) Now turn your attention to your hands. There is no need to move them or do anything with them. They may be touching the bed, or the floor, or somewhere on your body. Relax them if you can, and if not, simply paying attention to your hands for another moment.

10) Move your attention up into your arms. Maybe notice if you can find a moment of stillness inside you, like the pause at the end of each breath.

11) Next, move your attention around to your back. How does it feel against the bed or the floor? Notice how it rocks with each breath. When your mind gets busy or angry or scared, you can always come back to how your body feels in this way for a moment.

12) Now move attention to your neck and shoulders, letting go and relaxing them. If your mind wanders, that’s fine. No one can pay attention all the time. Just keep returning to noticing your body whenever you find yourself thinking of something else.

13) And now feel your face and head. What expression do you have right now? What would it feel like to smile? What else do you notice in your face, your head, and in your mind?

14) Finally, spend a few moments, paying attention to your whole body. If it is easier, continue to pay attention to your breath. If it’s time for sleep, let that happen, remaining still and continuing to pay attention to your breath or feelings in your body. And if it’s time to wake up, open your eyes and sit for a few moments before deciding when to move again.

Supportive Resources (optional):

Mindful. (2018). Body Scan for Kids – Mindful. [online] Available at: https://www.mindful.org/body-scan-kids

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

  • For older grades I would recite the entire Body Scan Script. I would also use this learning experience as an opportunity for students to begin a writing activity about how this made them feel and what they learned about themselves. Were they resistant to being still? Did they find this activity calming and peaceful? We could bring a focus towards the sacred circle/medicine wheel and have the students identify connections they made between the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of self.
  • For younger grades I would shorten the script to best meet the needs of their attention spans. I would also allow the students to find a quiet and comfortable spot within the classroom. I would prefer for them to be out of their desks/chairs.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Emotional: This activity offers various moments for students to pause and reflect on how this breathing exercise makes them feel. Examples: Is your mind and body relaxed or restless? Whatever you feel, or don’t feel is fine.

This activity reinforces the idea that this holistic exercise can affect people differently and that all feelings are valid.

Mental: This activity reminds you to focus on your current mental state, what are you thinking right here and right now. Is your mind buzzing? Is your mind quiet? Is your mind wandering? Can you bring your focus back to the present? What is holding you back?

Physical: Each step of this script focuses directly on both external and internal aspects of the human body.

Spiritual: Breathing activities are directly linked to mindfulness and embodying spirituality. Students can reflect on the interconnectedness of their internal and external body parts.

 

Holistic Learning Break: Laughter Yoga

Name: Taylor Block

Targeted Grade: Grade 7

Information retrieved from http://thepowerofhappy.com/how-to-do-laughter-yoga/ and some motions retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGNOF8DVIPQ

Description:

Script:

Okay Grade 7’s it is time for a little break! In your chairs, I want you to close your eyes and take thirty seconds to think about how you are currently feeling. Are you confused about what we were just learning? Are you stressed out or anxious? Are you feeling down?

Alright open your eyes and stand up! We are going to do some laughing yoga to convert all those emotions in to happier emotions!

You might feel silly or actually start laughing at yourself, but just go with it!

First, I want you to focus on where you feel the different types of laughter.

Ho, ho and feel it in your stomach.

Ha, ha and feel it in your chest

*Have students follow your lead

*Continue to alternate in between the two different laughter patterns and change the pace of it.

Put your hands on your knees and move your knees in a circle motion while laughing “ho” x4 times.

Now we are going to add in some stomping (Laughing pattern: slow ho, ho, quick ha, ha)

Feel your feet connect with the ground beneath them as you stomp.

*Switch to ha, ha, ha pattern

Now, imagine that through your laughter the noise is reaching up to connect to the skies and the existence beyond the clouds, as we reach up. It is as if your fingertips are connecting with the sky above us.

I want you all to walk up to two people and double high five them while laughing with them

Now, close your eyes, take a deep full breath, and let the air go. Think about how you feel now, are you happier or more relaxed.

*Ask: How does laughter make you feel? Why is it important that we take a break for ourselves and feel happy?

Connections to Holistic Health:

Physical: The physical domain is obviously reached in this activity as laughing, standing, stretching, and stomping is physical.

Mental: The mental aspect is present as the students have to think about how they are feeling in the beginning verse how they are feeling at the end, as well as keeping up with the patterns.

Spiritual: The aspect of reaching up to and connect with the skies or the heavens and connecting with the earth beneath us allows for a spiritual connection. The spiritual domain also means to feel that calm and relaxation that laughing yoga can bring to individuals at the end by giving them the opportunity to relieve stress, take a break, and clear the minds. They also had the opportunity to connect with others through high-fives and laughing together.

Emotional: The emotional domain is present as laughing yoga promotes happiness, relieves stress, and it also gave them the opportunity to reflect on how they were feeling verse how they felt after the activity.

Adapted for other Grade Level(s):

Laughing yoga is an easy activity to do with all ages. There is baby laughing yoga all the way up to laughing yoga for adults and the elderly. I would adapt this for younger grades such as Grade 3, by using easier to understand emotions such as happy, sad or angry when talking about how they are feeling, having them repeat after me during the laughing sessions so it is more of a guided back and forth, and at the end talk as a class how laughing makes us feel. For older grades, like Grade 11, it is sometimes harder to get them to buy in to activities because they do not want to look silly. I would probably show a video of a guided laughing yoga session and partake in the activity with them to show that it is not as silly. Robert Rivest has a lot of good videos on YouTube that you could use with your class. I did laughing yoga in high school and it is a memory that has stayed with me. I might do this activity right before final season or before other stressful events. I would ask them to reflect on how they are currently feeling and how they are handling it, and end with a journal or discussion on how the activity made them feel and why they need to take care of all aspects of their health  I would also describe to them how laughing yoga can relieve stress and that as we get older we get more stressed but also tend to laugh less often.

Name: Kaylee Mercer            

Targeted Grade Level: 2

Description of Active Task:

Step 1– Ask the students to stand up and have some space around the classroom

Step 2-Then ask the students some questions

àHave any of you ever planted a garden or flower before?

àHow do you feel when you are outside planting a garden or flower?

àWhat are some of the steps in planting a garden or a flower?

Step 3-Describe to the students to imagine that this entire classroom is our garden and we need to plant either some food or some flowers

Step 4-Tell the students to think of something that they want to plant in the garden

Step 5-Then sing the song to the students while showing the actions, getting the students to repeat after me

Step 6-Sing the song twice together as a class

Supportive Resources (optional):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13wd8KvOt58

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

®   For middle years or high school students, you could actually plant a garden together as a class or have each student plant their own flower.

®   For grades 3-5 you could bring in little pots and allow the students to plant beans, cherry tomatoes, or carrots

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

Physical- You guys were moving your bodies while singing the song

Spiritual- You have to understand that your seed is living and imagining that you are outside in nature

Emotional- You had the opportunity to express how gardening and planting makes you feel

Mental (Cognitive thinking)- You had to think about what you wanted to plant in the garden, whether it was a flower or some food and what steps it takes to plant a garden

SONG:

If your happy and you know it dig a hole

If your happy and you know it plant a seed

If your happy and you know it and you really want to show it, if your happy and you know it wet the seed

If your happy and you know it find the sun

If your happy and you know it watch it grow,

If your happy and you know it and you really want to show it, if your happy and you know it watch it grow.

Name: Rashelle Parcher

Targeted Grade Level:

Grade 4

Curricular Outcome:

USC4.6: Assess healthy stress management strategies (e.g., relaxation skills, stress control skills, guided imagery, expressing feelings, exercising).

  1. F) Analyze common coping strategies for managing stress

Description of Active Task:

–        Step 1: Start by saying, okay grade 4’s we’re just going to take a few minutes to relax, and focus on ourselves through a break called Breathing Colours

–        Step 2: Ask students to think of a relaxing colour, it can be any colour that you want as long as it makes you feel relaxed

–        Step 3: Now think of a colour that represents stress, sadness or anger, whichever of these emotions is most relevant in your life right now

–        Step 4: Close your eyes, and imagine you are surrounded by your relaxing colour. No longer is the air clear, it is your relaxing colour

–        Step 5: Now take a deep breath in and out slowly. As you slowly breathe become aware of breathing in your colour, into your nose, your throat, your chest and abdomen. Imagine now that your colour is spreading out within you, into every part of your body, and notice the effect that has. Notice how the colour is affecting your body, and your mind as you allow it to gently flow and fill your body and mind

–        Step 6: Continue to notice the colour and the sensations that it brings

–        Step 7: Imagine that as you breathe out, that your breath is the colour of your stress, anger, or sadness

–        Step 8: See your stress, anger, or sadness colour mix into the relaxing colour around you. Watch the stress slowly begin to disappear

–        Step 9:  And one more time, breathe in your relaxing colour, and breathe out your stress, anger or sadness colour

–        Step 10: When you’re ready begin to bring your attention back to the here and now

Supportive Resources (optional):

https://www.teachstarter.com/blog/classroom-mindfulness-activities-for-children/

https://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/colourbreathing.htm

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

–        For younger grades I would have them brainstorm colours and their potential emotional meanings beforehand. So, we would take about colours that relate to feeling relaxed, feeling stressed, sad or angry, then I would write them on the board so as I am prompting them, they have something to refer back to.

–        For older grades I would start by talking about the effects that negative emotions can have on the body, and I would also incorporate them feeling the negative emotion leaving more of their body parts such as their shoulders.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

–        Physical:

o   This activity asks students to focus on specific parts of their body’s, both internal and external while they are breathing, and noticing how the release makes their body feel.

–        Spiritual:

o   Students are taking a step back from whatever is going on in their lives to practice mindfulness. They must reflect on how their feelings and imagine their connection to a specific colour based on their current feelings

–        Emotional:

o   Allows the students to analyze how they are currently feeling, are you feeling stressed? Happy? Angry?

–        Mental (Cognitive Thinking):

o   Focuses on the students’ current mental state and asks them to think about the underlying meanings of certain colours

  •  for example, purple could be related to feeling relaxed while blue could be representative of feeling sad

EHE 310 – Holistic Health Learning Breaks

Name: Wei Li

Targeted Grade Level: Grade 3

Description of Active Task:

Name: Stand Up or Sit Down

  1. The students can start out in a standing or sitting position. They can stand behind their chair or any place they like in the classroom. Or, they can sit on their chair or sit on the ground as they like.
  2. Ask them questions, such as “do you have a sister?” or “are you wearing pink?” Show all the questions through PowerPoint.
  3. If their answer is “Yes,” they change to the other position (stand or sit).
  4. If their answer is “No,” then they stay the same position.

Adaptations for other Grade Level(s):

We can change the questions to adapt for different grades. For example, for younger kids, we can choose some easier questions, such as ‘Do you like cheese?’ ‘are you wearing black clothes?’. For older grades, we can make some more curriculum related questions. And also, we can prepare less questions for younger kids and more questions for older kids.

Connection to Holistic Wellness:

In this activity, it involved students with physical movements and also there was a relaxing background music to help relieve their stress. This is good for their physical and spiritual health. The questions could remind the students to think something about their family, their happy moments, or some health knowledge. This is good for their emotional and mental health. Through those questions, I could also know more about my students, and the students could know more about their classmates, such as their interests. It is better for building and strengthening relationships in the class.

Good morning grade 3s, now let’s take a break.

  1. Firstly, you can start out in a standing or sitting position. you can stand behind your chairs or any place you like in the classroom. Or, you can sit on your chair or sit on the ground as you like.
  2. Then I will show you some questions, such as “do you have a sister?” or “are you wearing pink?”
  3. If your answer is “Yes,” then you change to the other position.  This means if you are standing, then you sit down. If you are sitting, then you stand up.
  4. If your answer is “No,” then you stay the same position.